Author Archive Pumla Dlamini

Promoting fish migration awareness at Epworth Primary School

The Aquatic Ecosystem Research team was invited to Epworth Primary School to give a presentation about World Fish Migration Day (WFMD) to the grade 4-7 pupils on the 1stof June 2018. WFMD is a global event coordinated by the World Fish Migration Foundation to highlight the importance of migratory fish and river connectivity.

In connection with the WFMD theme, “connecting fish, rivers and people”, the AER team spoke to the pupils about the importance of river connectivity for not only migratory fish, but the community at large. The presentation included a video, The Duzi Gold, which showcases the obstacles that migratory fish have to get over in order to access resources and suitable habitats. There were some indigenous fish on display for the students to have a look at which they were VERY excited to see! There was also a fish swimway (fish ladder) model on display and the students were quite fascinated to learn how the ladder can allow fish to swim over a weir or dam! Students were also given the opportunity to play their own role our understanding of the importance of river connectivity by “adopting a fish” whose behavior will be monitored in a KZN yellowfish tagging survey as part of the uMngeni Fish track study lead by the AER Group.

If you are keen to support this project by adopting a fish, contact us Pumla or Matthew. If you’d like to to organise a visit to your school, let us know !

Few photos for Solly Pecket (Epworth School) from this great outing !

(c) Solly Pecket

(c) Solly Pecket

(c) Solly Peckett

(c) Solly Pecket

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A tagging study : movements of KwaZulu-Natal yellowfish in the upper uMngeni River.

Riverine ecosystems are affected by anthropogenic activities and environmental changes. One of the ways in which to evaluate the effect of these impacts is assessing the behaviour ecology of fish populations. Fish behaviour tells us how fish adapt to human activities (survival and recruitment) and how they improve their use of ecosystem resources. Behavioural variables include habitat selection, reproduction and reproductive strategies and migration behaviour. Information on fish behaviour can be used in conservation of fish and the aquatic ecosystems they occupy.

As part of a study on the uMngeni River we will be looking at the reproductive biology and migration behaviour of the KwaZulu-Natal yellowfish (Labeobarbus natalensis). This involves evaluating the location, timing and duration of spawning migrations of yellowfish in the uMngeni River. Thus far, 22 yellowfish have been tagged with VI tags (Figure 1) at the inlet of the uMngeni River into Midmar dam, with the intention to tag more over time. We would like to call on all anglers in the upper uMgeni River for the assistance in recording data from any tagged yellowfish they may catch as this will aid the study immensely.

We need your help ! In the event that a tagged yellowfish is caught please, at best, take note of the following and let us know:

1. The location (include site coordinates if possible)
2. The date
3. The VI tag number (e.g. D 55)
4. The standard length of the fish (mm)*
5. The weight of the fish (g)
6.Note any abnormalities (e.g. deformity, disease or injury)
7. Photo of VI tag and full body photo (see examples below)

Figure 1: Orange arrows shows : on the left, the placement of the VI tag behind the eye, and on the right the placement of the VI tag in relation to the body of the fish.

Please Contact the following people below with any information or questions:
Pumla Dlamini: pumladlamini1@gmail.com, Matthew Burnett: matthew@riversoflife.co.za and Dr. Gordon O’Bien: obrien@ukzn.ac.za

 

* Standard length :

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