Tag Archive REMP

Tales of a 6-months internship with the AER Team by Emily Winter

Emily Winter shares some of the highlights of her six-month internship with the Aquatic Ecosystem Research Group.

Back in April, I was pleased to be met with a welcoming and enthusiastic group at UKZN, who readily introducing me to the research themes, team members and field sites. I was eager to challenge myself and quickly got stuck into some fish surgery practice with Céline and Matthew, in preparation for the FishTrack project in the uMngeni catchment. I soon overcame my fear of croc-infested waters and could be found checking nets and electro-fishing at Fountain Hill Estate in search of the Natal yellowfish. I was excited to be assisting Matthew and co in the development of their new, real-time telemetry project.

Assisting Matt in catching yellow fish in Fountainhill Estate (Wartburg)

While also assisting with the quarterly REMP (River Eco Status Monitoring Programme) surveys, my own project was developing under the watchful eyes of Gordon and Celine, and in June I joined the SAPPI team to explore the lower Thukela catchment and monitor its fish and invertebrate communities. A hypothesis was born, and I focussed my investigations on the use of the Nembe and eMandeni tributaries by fish when the Thukela river is in flux. My fish identification and surveying skills progressed rapidly with the support of Mahomed, particularly in distinguishing between the small barb (Enteromius) species, and I was proud to be able to lead similar surveys in July and August. The opportunity to survey the Thukela fishway with Gordon, David and Mphatheni was a particular highlight, with initial results suggesting that the structure does not function as a migration corridor as well as would be hoped.

Conducting REMP surveys in the Umgeni with Fortunate and Pumla.

In the final few months, I was very fortunate to be invited to contribute towards international efforts for a review paper on African fish migrations (yet to be published). The experience has been invaluable in developing my scientific critique, writing and collaboration skills and I have learnt a considerable amount about African freshwater ecology in the process. Despite returning to Europe, I am excited about continuing this trend, maintaining connections with my new South African friends and colleagues, and developing ways in which we can work together in the future. With the help of Mahomed, I will be remotely completing the ‘Tributary Refuge’ project on the Thukela and I look forward to sharing the results with the wider research community when the time comes.

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