Tag Archive eels

Let the fish swim : send Matt and Céline to Australia !

Tags, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

We were busy celebrating the World Fish Migration Day 2018 !

The Aquatic Ecosystem Research team has been busy with World Fish Migration Day 21st April 2018: Kruger National Park – Sabie River, Palmiet River and Msunduzi/uMngeni River.

World fish migration day (WFMD) is an event held globally every two years aquatic scientist with support from the World Fish Migration Foundation (WFMF). The WFMF encourages scientist within water resource research to host an event locally to create awareness for the migration of fish, promoting the connectivity of rivers and the work they are doing to contribute to river connectivity. The Aquatic Ecosystem Research (AER) group within the CWRR at UKZN co-hosted with WFMF (a team of Dutch scientists) and South African National Parks (SANParks) an event within the Kruger National Park. This event became the WFMD headquarters for Africa. The event extended over three days ending on the 21st of April in Skukuza Rest Camp and had various activities all focusing around fish connectivity within Rivers, and the benefits of having healthy fish to have healthy Rivers and healthy people.

On the day the book “From Sea to Source 2.0: Protection and restoration of fish migration in rivers worldwide” was launched. The book contained articles from all over the world on different problems and solutions to fish migrations three small chapters were written by Dr Gordon O’Brien programme leader for the AER-UKZN group. The book was handed over to and warmly received by the Managing Executive of KNP Mr Glenn Philips. Other SANParks official along with the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (DEAT) for Limpopo and environmental consulting companies attended the event.

Leading up to the day, Kanniedood Dam near Shingwedzi Rest Camp was demolished using explosives as part of the KNP’s water management policy to restore the parks natural water distribution and improve river connectivity. Further natural science pupils from local schools were invited to be educated on the topic of fish migrations and interact with local and international scientist and managers, with the Sabie River weir and gauging station used as demonstrations. The students were given the chance to see some of the local fish species as the AER team showed them how to catch fish and do SASS5 monitoring. Other activities for the event included: Press releases from local and international news organisations, fishway demonstrations, face paints, a small aquarium with local species (15 species were on display) and posters of the research the AER-UKZN group are involved in.

The team involvement in Kruger also lead to a nice article in the Sunday Citizen, that you can read here.

Here within KwaZulu-Natal the AER hosted two other events. The first event took place on the 11 March to accommodate the high-school canoe races, the second took place within the Palmiet River event on the 21st April. The canoe race was co-hosted with the girls from St Anne’s High School. The challenge was to paddle the race upstream instead of downstream. The idea was warmly received, and the kids got first-hand experience of what fish go through when migrating upstream. The kids got fully involved tackling rapids, current and dams to get to the finish line. The whole event was filmed and presented to the world on World Fish Migration Day in Skukuza, KNP and launched online. The theme around the video was ‘Duzi Gold’ with yellowfish being equated to a living commodity as valuable as gold. Check out our video by searching for ‘Duzi Gold’ online to see the paddlers paddling upstream.

The Palmiet River event was co-hosted with the Palmiet River Valley Conservancy (PRVC). The Palmiet River was selected as it flows directly into the Umgeni River Estuary and is a socio-economically important system, despite the many problems it faces as an urban river. The socio-ecological importance of fish communities was highlighted, as well as the multiple stressors negatively influencing them, particularly within the Palmiet River. The event had various public interaction sessions with an array of activities. An aquarium housing the species caught within the Palmiet were on show, this included a 900 mm eel which became the centre of attention. Maps were placed on displays providing information to the public. In addition, citizen science tools (miniSASS and the clarity tube) were demonstrated. Members of the public were encouraged to take cognisance of the environmental impacts around them and to take action.

 

All in all, World Fish Migration Day was a great success! The various events held by the AER-UKZN team with support from the CWRR centre all drew in the crowds and created much needed awareness towards the connectivity of Rivers. We all started thinking of how well-connected our rivers are, particularly the uMgeni River. Not only are we fighting pollution issues’ but we need to create free flowing rivers within the catchments we find ourselves in.

 

Follow these links to learn more.

World Fish Migration Day: https://www.worldfishmigrationday.com/

From Sea to Source 2.0: Protection and restoration of fish migration in rivers worldwide: https://jonesriver.org/getfile/herringcount/FromSeaToSource2.0.pdf

Duzi Gold Series

 

Tags, , , , , , , , , , ,

Latest news from the eels of KwaZulu-Natal

Last year, we’ve been granted a Foundational Biodiversity Information Programme grant to investigate the distribution and genetic diversity of Freshwater eels in the main rivers of KwaZulu-Natal. The project started in July 2016 and we just ended the field work.

This project aims to evaluate the change in historical distribution and genetic diversity of Anguillid eels along the East Coast of KwaZulu-Natal. To achieve these aims the following objectives have been proposed:

  1. Review the historical distribution (based on museum records) of freshwater eels in KwaZulu-Natal,
  2. Evaluate the change in distribution of freshwater eels in KwaZulu-Natal,
  3. Evaluate the genetic variability of freshwater eels from populations in main rivers of KwaZulu-Natal.

In the last two months, we focused our sampling effort in under-represented and under-sampled areas of the province where historical data was available as well as local knowledge. We then travelled to the Umtamvuna, Umzimkhulu, Umgeni, Thukela and the North Coast where we caught 15 eels (and 3 species Anguilla mossambica, A. marmorata and A. bengalensis labiata). Here are a few photos !

NB : All eels were released back where we caught them. It has to be noted that we work under a strict ethical code of conduct and that no fish were harm in any case. 

Guests at Zingela River Safari were really keen to learn about eels !

This eel caught in the Thukela was a little bit too big for our measuring pipe ! This is a giant mottled eel (A. marmorata) measuring 119 cm !

This African mottled eel, A. bengalensis labiata, has got some sharp teeth !

Setting some fyke nets and rafting in the Thukela

Electrofishing in the Thukela

Longfin eel (A. mossambica) caught in Harding in a farm dam !

Dr Peter Calverley, happy to help in Zingela ! Thanks to him for most of the photo presented here and all the help !

Setting fyke nets can sometimes be quite adventurous !

A pretty looking Longfin eel caught in Palm Lakes Estate. What do you think of that coloration ?

All the occurence data and barcode will be available ealy in the new year via GBIF and BOLD database.

We received tremendous help from local conservancies, fisherman, landowners and other enthusiasts and we want to really thank them for them help ! We would like to especially thank Michael House Nature Reserve, Donovale Farming, Palmiet Nature Reserve, the Payn Familly from Harding, Ben from Leitch Landscape, Helene and Paul from Simbithi Eco Estate, Dave and Chris from Palm Lakes Estate, Peter and everyone else at Zingela River Safari for their contribution (access, accomodation, warm welcome, help on the field and equipment).

Tags, , , , , , , ,